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FREE FILM SERIES RETURNS FOR JANUARY AT THE DETROIT HISTORICAL MUSEUM AND DOSSIN GREAT LAKES MUSEUM

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DETROIT– The Detroit Historical Society’s January film series features a look back at “The Hudson’s Building” and an exploration of the contemporary Native American life in “Our Fires Still Burn.” Watch “The Hudson’s Building” at 3 p.m. on Saturday, January 14 and Sunday, January 15 at the Detroit Historical Museum and “Our Fires Still Burn: The Native American Experience” at 2 p.m. on Saturday, January 14 and Sunday, January 15 at the Dossin Great Lakes Museum. As always, admission to the films and museums is FREE!

More about the films:

  • “The Hudson’s Building”: This 1997 film chronicles the history of the legendary Hudson’s Department Store in downtown Detroit and the debate over possible demolition of the structure after its abandonment by Hudson’s in 1983. It includes historic photos, home movies, and interviews with Hudson’s employees and customers, city planners, developers and members of city council. The Metro Times called it “truly relevant and exciting documentary filmmaking.” Written and produced by Gary Glaser and Dave Toorongian. Directed by Gary Glaser. Narrated by David Dixon. Shown at the Detroit Historical Museum. Running time: 45 minutes. Admission is FREE.

 

  • “Our Fires Still Burn: The Native American Experience”: The stories shared in “Our Fires Still Burn: The Native American Experience” reflect an American history fraught with the systematic destruction of a people. Yet, amidst the debris of suffering and trauma, there is resilience and a profound remembering and healing taking place. This documentary invites viewers into the lives of contemporary Native American role models living in the U.S. Midwest. Shown at the Dossin Great Lakes Museum. Running time: 60 minutes. Admission is FREE.

The Society’s Film Series features free monthly screenings of fascinating Detroit films at the Detroit Historical Museum and the Dossin Great Lakes Museum. Join us next month for:

  • “Detroit Civil Rights Trilogy” at the Detroit Historical Museum on Saturday, February 11 and Sunday, February 12
  • “Proudly We Served” at the Dossin Great Lakes Museum on Saturday, February 11 and Sunday, February 12

See the full list of upcoming films and learn more at http://detroithistorical.org/things-do/lectures-films

The Detroit Historical Museum, located at 5401 Woodward Ave. (NW corner of Kirby) in Midtown Detroit, is open to the public Tuesday through Friday from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission is free for all, all the time. Parking in the Museum’s lot is $7 at all times. Group tour pricing and information is available by calling 313.833.7979. Permanent exhibits include the famous Streets of Old Detroit, the Allesee Gallery of Culture, Kid Rock Music Lab,Doorway to Freedom: Detroit and the Underground Railroad, Detroit: The “Arsenal of Democracy,” the Gallery of Innovation, Frontiers to Factories, America’s Motor City, and The Glancy Trains. For more information, call the Museum at 313.833.1805 or check out our website at detroithistorical.org.

The Dossin Great Lakes Museum is located at 100 Strand Drive on Belle Isle. Admission is free for all, all the time. Permanent exhibits include Built by the River in the John A. and Marlene L. Boll Foundation Gallery, the Miss Pepsi vintage 1950s championship hydroplane, the Gothic Room from the City of Detroit III in the Polk Family Hall, a bow anchor from the S.S. Edmund Fitzgerald, the pilothouse from the Great Lakes freighterS.S. William Clay Ford in the Wayne and Joan Webber Foundation Gallery, and one of the largest known collections of scale model ships in the world. For more information, call the Museum at 313.833.1805 or check out our website at detroithistorical.org.

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